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The Refugee Crisis

Professor Christian Dustmann comments on the current European debate on the refugee crisis and migration quotas on BBC World Service 

 

Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare

Attending universal childcare from age three significantly improves the school readiness of children from immigrant and disadvantaged family backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

iNews

UCL News

FAZ

VoxEU

 

The Criminal Behaviour of Young Fathers

CReAM Research by Christian Dustmann and  Rasmus Landersø, finds that  very young fathers who have their first child while they are still teenagers subsequently commit less crime if the child is a boy than if it is a girl. This  then has a spill over effect on other young men of a similar age living in the same neighbourhoods as the young father. The research was covered on the British press.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

VoxEU

The Telegraph

The Times

 

BBC 2

"I was quite prepared... to use the cover of the statistician's analysis": Former home secretary David Blunkett and Prof Dustmann on the 2003 report on EU accession

 

British Academy

Professor Christian Dustmann has been elected Fellow of the British Academy in recognition for his academic career and public engagement.

 

Handelsblatt

Professor Christian Dustmann ranked within the top 3 German speaking economists on the 2017 Handelsblatt ranking.

 

Brexit

BBC News

Professor Christian Dustmann discussing recent trends in foreign-born worker flows in and out of the UK on the BBC News at One.

 

External Research Fellow

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Email: joseph.altonji@yale.edu

[CV] [webpage]

Joseph Altonji

Joseph G. Altonji is the Thomas DeWitt Cuyler Professor of Economics at Yale University and a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He previously held faculty positions at Columbia and Northwestern and served as a visiting professor at Princeton and Harvard. He is an elected fellow of the Econometric Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Society of Labor Economists (currently President-Elect).

Altonji specializes in labor economics and applied econometrics. His interests include labor market fluctuations, labor supply, consumption behavior, the economics of education, economic links among family members, race and gender in the labor market, wage determination, and econometric methods. His current research focuses on the role of families and schools in inequality, school choice programs, dynamic models of earnings, marriage, and family income, the effects of undergraduate field of study and graduate field of study on labor major outcomes, the costs of college majors, the effects of labor market conditions on recent college graduates, the effects of financial constraints on academic performance in college, and the use of selection on observed variables to address selection on unobserved variables.

Altonji has served as a consultant to the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and on a number of advisory panels, including the NAS/NRC Committee on National Statistics, the NAS/NRC Panel on Measuring Discrimination, and the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology STEM Undergraduate Education Working Group. He is a member of the Federal Economic Statistics Advisory Committee and the NSF Social, Behavior and Economic Sciences Advisory Committee.

Joseph Altonji joined CReAM as an external fellow in January 2018.